Small Coors Light Lead

Steve’s breakdown: So the CEO of MillerCoors is talking about getting “Coors Light Back On Track” with hitting Americans with the old “the world’s most refreshing beer” strategy and changing the creative to reintroduce Coors Light’s cold-activated packaging. Sounds Sexy . . . just like that Silver Bullet Train . . . .Tracks.

Obviously, you can see by my sarcasm, we think there might be some side projects for you nimble folks out there could pitch Coors with this old-now-new strategy.

Either way, it’ll get the creatives excited.

CHICAGO, IL: MillerCoors flagship Coors Light continues to struggle, and CEO Gavin Hattersley continues to preach the need for a turnaround.

MillerCoors parent company Molson Coors Brewing Company reported its 2018 third-quarter results Wednesday, and while underlying earnings numbers skewed positively, MillerCoors lost 3.3 percent brand volume domestically, primarily due to declines in the premium light segment, which includes Coors Light and Miller Lite. In an interview posted on MillerCoors’ Behind the Beer Blog, Hattersley said improving that segment needs to be the company’s focus.

“We’ve done a lot of things that we can build on,” he said. “But the fact that our volume trend lagged the industry just reinforces our need to take action and make some meaningful changes to get on the path to growth.”

Hattersley stressed the need to get Coors Light “back on track” first and foremost. He said the company will emphasize Coors Light’s status as “the world’s most refreshing beer,” which has been highlighted in recent advertising releases.

“We are going to celebrate what makes Coors Light so special — how it’s cold lagered, cold filtered and cold packaged — in a way that resonates with today’s drinkers,” Hattersley said.

He added that ads will reintroduce Coors Light’s cold-activated packaging. MillerCoors parted ways with its chief marketing officer David Kroll earlier this year.

Unlike Coors Light, Milwaukee favorite Miller Lite appears to be holding its own in the premium light category. Hattersley said it continues to take share in the premium light segment and hold share overall.

Hattersley also discussed the company’s ongoing restructuring, albeit in little specific detail. MillerCoors announced it would eliminate 350 positionsacross the company in September, although it remains unknown how many of the jobs will be lost in Milwaukee.

Hattersley said the voluntary severance program offered as part of the restructuring was “greatly appreciated by people across the organization.”

“It was necessary as our fixed cost base was too high relative to our scale,” he said. “We needed to align our organization with the size of our business, and we’ve done that.”

The restructuring will help MillerCoors better invest in growing offerings like fast-growing Mexican lager Sol, Italian import brand Peroni, and it’s new low-calorie flavored beverage Cape Line, Hattersley said. He also more vaguely mentioned MillerCoors implementing a “team structure” to enable faster decision making.

“We recognize we need to change how we execute our strategy if we are going to get different results,” Hattersley said. “We need to move faster because the pace of the business is much faster than it used to be. That means moving more quickly than we once might have in order to capitalize on a big opportunity, and be more willing to cut the cord faster if something clearly is not working as planned.”

MillerCoors flagship Coors Light continues to struggle, and CEO Gavin Hattersley continues to preach the need for a turnaround.

MillerCoors parent company Molson Coors Brewing Company reported its 2018 third-quarter results Wednesday, and while underlying earnings numbers skewed positively, MillerCoors lost 3.3 percent brand volume domestically, primarily due to declines in the premium light segment, which includes Coors Light and Miller Lite. In an interview posted on MillerCoors’ Behind the Beer Blog, Hattersley said improving that segment needs to be the company’s focus.

“We’ve done a lot of things that we can build on,” he said. “But the fact that our volume trend lagged the industry just reinforces our need to take action and make some meaningful changes to get on the path to growth.”

Hattersley stressed the need to get Coors Light “back on track” first and foremost. He said the company will emphasize Coors Light’s status as “the world’s most refreshing beer,” which has been highlighted in recent advertising releases.

“We are going to celebrate what makes Coors Light so special — how it’s cold lagered, cold filtered and cold packaged — in a way that resonates with today’s drinkers,” Hattersley said.

He added that ads will reintroduce Coors Light’s cold-activated packaging. MillerCoors parted ways with its chief marketing officer David Kroll earlier this year.

Unlike Coors Light, Milwaukee favorite Miller Lite appears to be holding its own in the premium light category. Hattersley said it continues to take share in the premium light segment and hold share overall.

Hattersley also discussed the company’s ongoing restructuring, albeit in little specific detail. MillerCoors announced it would eliminate 350 positionsacross the company in September, although it remains unknown how many of the jobs will be lost in Milwaukee.

Hattersley said the voluntary severance program offered as part of the restructuring was “greatly appreciated by people across the organization.”

“It was necessary as our fixed cost base was too high relative to our scale,” he said. “We needed to align our organization with the size of our business, and we’ve done that.”

The restructuring will help MillerCoors better invest in growing offerings like fast-growing Mexican lager Sol, Italian import brand Peroni, and it’s new low-calorie flavored beverage Cape Line, Hattersley said. He also more vaguely mentioned MillerCoors implementing a “team structure” to enable faster decision making.

“We recognize we need to change how we execute our strategy if we are going to get different results,” Hattersley said. “We need to move faster because the pace of the business is much faster than it used to be. That means moving more quickly than we once might have in order to capitalize on a big opportunity, and be more willing to cut the cord faster if something clearly is not working as planned.”

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